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" Contempt through affirmation: "My partner, he wants to be." Fearful curses sanctioned by nominal cancellation: "May all your teeth fall out except one, so that you can have a toothache, God forbid." Derisive dismissal disguised an innocent interrogation: "I should pay him for such devoted service? Help keep Yiddish alive by learning new words and making them a part of your everyday conversation.This list is by no means complete, but it's enough to get you started sounding like a Member of the Tribe. " "Shlep" vs "Schlep" Also, please be respectful of my time and ask nice!!Yiddish offers more ways of identifying various kinds of "idiots" (with all their subtle variations) than Eskimos have for different kinds of snow.From Comic Book shows like Arrow and The Flash, short-run series like Better Call Saul, to High Concept Drama like & Person Of Interest; the DVMPE is your watercooler for discussing the best television out there. The DVMPE also produces podcasts covering a wide range of Popular and Geek Culture: movies, music, comic books, gaming and much more! We're always looking for new ideas, so if you have one, get in touch!We bring you a tremendous range of entertaining podcasts for your listening pleasure. The DVM Podcast Empire story began in the Summer of 2009, when David Vox Mullen approached his friends Keith Connor and Eric Olsen to start a podcast with him about the upcoming ABC show, Flashforward.Notes: "ch" is pronounced like the "ch" in the Scottish "loch," as if you're cleaning a phlegm from your throat, unless otherwise specified.."r" is gently rolled, as the single "r" in Spanish or French.

(sometimes called, simply, AK) Years ago, my mother was trying to convince my then 8-year old nephew that he actually knew quite a bit more Yiddish than he realized. I don't know if my grandmother made up the alternate usage or if it was something she heard. bungalow colony) circuit, during the 1930's-1970's. Most of the Jewish (and some gentile) comics of the older generation got their starts or worked here, including Jerry Lewis, Joan Rivers, Robert Klein, Rodney Dangerfield, Shecky Greene, Woody Allen, Morey Amsterdam, Lenny Bruce, Don Rickles, Henny Youngman, Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner, Milton Berle, Buddy Hackett, Shelley Berman, Alan King, Jonathan Winters and many, many more. ) The bunglalow colonies are too numerous to mention but my and my husband's personal faves are Pancrest Lodge (South Fallsburg) and Mountainview near Monticello. Let's just say the itinerant knish man wasn't just Broygis: (BROY-gas) angry, pissed off, with a mad-on, having a shit-fit, mad at someone, on the outs with someone, not on speaking terms. lah) a delicious bread made with lots of eggs, usually braided, and served at Sabbath dinner or other holidays meals (except Passover where no bread is allowed). "Chap a gang" means "catch a road" (or path or way) or, as we'd say in English, "Hit the road! Any kind of garbage, whether it's junk food, shoddy merchandise or stuff of little or no value. All my daughter-in-law feeds him is Chinik: (chi-nik; the "ch" in this case is pronouced as in the English "church") a tea kettle.

(pronunciation guide added only to words whose pronunciation might be questionable from the spelling.

If no guide is given, it's pronounced as it looks.)Note, too, that Yiddish is actually written with Hebrew letters, therefore, when used in English, words are transliterated, or spelled as they sound (as we write Chinese or Arabic words in English.) Since Yiddish was spoken by Jews all over Europe, accents and inflexions varied greatly. For example, "ferdrayed" is the same as "fardrayed" is the same as "tsedrayd" etc. It's totally Italian, but for some reason many people seem to think it's Yiddish and have asked me what it means. "If my grandmother had balls, she'd be my grandfather.") It's the more sarcastic equivalent of the English expression "..if I had wings, I would fly." (A less "blue" version is "If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a trolley car.") Billig: cheap, inexpensive.

The addition of a rhyme beginning with "shm" to denote something of little consequence ("Hospital, shmospital... This from Leo Rosten's wonderful book "The Joys of Yiddish": (The questioner as asking whether he/she should attend a concert being given by a niece.

The meaning of the same sentence changes completely, depending on where the speaker places the emphasis:) ? According to Rosten, there are other linguistic devices in English, derived from Yiddish syntax, which subtly "convey nuances of affection, compassion, displeasure, emphasis, disbelief, skepticism, ridicule, sarcasm, and scorn." Mordant syntax: "Smart, he isn't." Sarcasm through innocuous diction: "He only tried to shoot himself." Scorn through reversed word order: "Already you're discouraged?

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